LIL BIT OF SAN FRANCISCO

We finally made it to the mainland and reunited with some of my family–hooray!

It was so nice to feel “at home” and be able to relax a little without feeling completely guilty for not getting out, doing and seeing things.

My aunt Lauren, uncle Kurt and their kids Max (11) and Natasha (5) live just outside of the city in Lafayette. I visited last time I was in the states, but the kids were real young then. It was nice to “re-meet” my cousins and spend time with the family. Max is sweet and quiet and definitely turning into a very smart cookie. Natasha was exuding excitement about meeting us. She arrived home from school, grinning ear to ear as she gave me a little cuddle, then she watched me attentively, her head pressed against the window, while I sat outside and read. It wasn’t long before she started climbing all over Abel, begging us to play tag and Peppa Pig with her.

To be honest, most mornings in Lafayette Abel and I arose at around 10 or 11 am. We had done a red-eye from Honolulu. I passed out for the whole flight, experiencing weird dreams about sleeping on a plane. It’s damn strange how our brains do that. I was in a deep sleep, but I was very aware of where I was and what I was doing. Abel took a sleeping pill too, and just like our first flight, barely slept a wink. I don’t know how he managed to fight off the drug-induced hallucinations as well, but he had a decent 6-hour nap our first day in Cali.

We really only had three main touristy days. The first was a visit to Stinson Beach and the Redwoods. We drove in my aunt’s Ford Explorer–a little beast– around winding roads, with huge escarpments banked to the right, and a steep drop with no railing or fence to our left. Our mission was completed, we’d made it to the park entrance, only to be told we were required to reserve parking and wouldn’t be able to return for another hour and 30 minutes. No problem, Lauren had told us Stinson beach was a cute little town, so we journeyed back up the climbing roads and down some more towards the coastline. Time ticked away pretty quickly as we drove, so our visit to to Stinson was a mere stroll along the beach, a quick coffee and stop in the cutest little bookshop.

Seeing beaches that are so vastly different from the ones back home is always interesting. At Stinson, there are houses built directly on the sand, with metre high walls to stop the tides from causing any damage. I thought living a street back from the beach was enough create to worry about tsunamis, but these guys would be toast.


This is the little literature shop I dragged Abel into (and subtly hinted at the card section for my upcoming birthday haha). The owner had a vast but nicely curated selection of books. Working for the past six or so months in a bookshop has taught me a lot about the industry (on top of my organic adoration for books and writing) and I immediately want to talk and ask questions upon questions. It wasn’t really needed, because the owner muttered to herself behind the counter, apologised and went on to tell me about issues she was having with arriving shipments from her publishers. I could wander (or loiter) in a bookshop for hours and not even buy anything. Looking at the different stories and texts that are out there, breathing in the distinct scent of ink and fresh paper, is more than enough for me.

The Redwoods had a few different trail options. We decided to take the “middle” one, meaning not the shortest nor the longest. Turns out it was a lot longer than we had realised, starting with an incline that took us up through the woods and out into an open space, with a valley falling out far below us. Huge hills sat cuddled close together and you could just vaguely see the ocean in the distance (always a sigh of relief and comfort for me). The Bay Area is foggy as hell so the strip of ocean almost felt like a mirage. We struggled to get high quality photos, especially since we’re learning photographers.

After making our way up and out of the valley, the trail circled back through the forest and the trees slowly became more mammoth like. I questioned Abel on the possibility of mountain lines, but figured there weren’t any warning signs at the beginning of the trail, so surely we were safe. Maybe two minutes later Abel stopped dead in his tracks, grabbed me and told me to look to my left. A furry, brown blob appeared in my peripherals and I screamed at an intense decibel. It was just a stag.

Two days later was my 24th birthday and it just didn’t feel like it all. I mean, I had such a wonderful day and entire weekend (Lauren bought me cute pressies, cooked us a wonderful dinner on the Sunday and ordered a selection of delectable cupcakes), but all day, I kept forgetting it was my birthday– I guess that’s the burden of ageing. That was the first day Abel and I ventured into the city, an easy 40 minute (if that) train ride from Lafayette. The day was spent walking along the pier, gorging on In-N-Out, visiting Reformation and buying myself a classic black dress, cocktails, wine, more gorging, more wine.

In-N-Out has a huge reputation around it and there was no disappointment for us. While the place was packed–the line snaking around and out of the front doors– the food was fresh, cheap and came out within a matter of 15-20 minutes. We visited again two days later.

During my last visit in San Francisco, my cousin Elise took me on a mission across the city so we could shop at her favourite store. Literally, I think she said “just two more blocks” about 10 times. I ended up with blisters from my jelly sandals (what was I thinking?) and had to walk barefoot in the city. Abel and I had a good laugh because I pretty much did that exact same thing to him on this visit. I believed Reformation was a matter of a few blocks away and led Abel far up Fillmore Street (known for it’s steep hills and steps). Totally worth it, in my opinion– the dress is gorgeous and I’ll have it forever.

All the walking meant we were ready to start drinking and we pretty much bar-hopped around the Marina District for the rest of the evening. We went to the Tipsy Pig twice. In the late afternoon it was packed with young people enjoying early cocktails in the beer garden. When we returned later in the evening, it had calmed down considerably, but the heaters and fairy lights were in full swing, and we had planked ourselves right next to an Aussie! Hearing that familiar accent was beyond comforting for us. Something about being with someone from home just means you can sit back and relax– you’re all on the “same level” in a way. Regardless that he was a bit of dickhead, it was still just lovely.


Our third and final tourist event we ticked off was our visit to Alcatraz Island, where there was once a maximum security prison. We didn’t walk around the entire island, even though there’s much more to see, we were mainly interested in the prison. The free audio tour was spectacular. Voices from the officers and surviving prisoners took us through the prison depicting what life had been like there. A few of them had tried to escape, some successfully and others not. I use “successfully” lightly– they made it out, but were never seen again. Whether they drowned or went to South America, no one knows. One of the quotes plastered on a big sign said that when you broke the rules, you went to prison, but when you broke prison rules, you went to Alcatraz.

Some families of the guards even lived on the island, in this house:

Prisoners could sometimes see the San Francisco skyline, depending on where their cell was located. They talked of hearing party sounds on New Years Eve from boats on the water. Imagine being so isolated from freedom but so close to it? You’d rather be in a prison settled into the middle of nowhere, so you can’t remember the sounds and smells of the free world.

Balancing the relaxing with the exploring was key for our time in Lafayette and SF. The nice thing was knowing we’ll probably be back there at some point and we can do even more. We’ll be in California by April (Coachella baby) so another visit with the fam will definitely be on the cards.

New York City is over now too and we’re back with more family, East Coast this time. I’ll be back to tell y’all about it soon.

A

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