SOME THINGS (PLACES, MOMENTS ETC.) THAT I’VE LOVED SO FAR

I talked in my last post about how everything’s not always hunky dory, smooth sailing while on this kind of journey– and that’s ok. After having a chat with my dear friend Simone she made me realise something. I mentioned how cleaning the van is a constant activity. There’s not a lot of space to leave dirty clothes strewn about (ahem, Abel) and they pile up quick-fast. Plus, you’re constantly going from outside to inside your personal living quarters, so dirt is sure to be prevalent. Simone said, “It’s funny how even though you are living on the road and it’s a bit of a dream, the realities of normal life like cleaning and stuff never stop.” Absolutely correct, and in lots of ways, the cleaning is worse and more constant than if you were hanging about in your house. When you’re at home, there’s more space for things to be messy, so that kind of allows more time for you to put cleaning off. We don’t have that luxury. But then she said, “which in a way is good, because it keeps you grounded!” Right again, Simone. I hadn’t thought of it that way. We can’t always be caught up in how amazing our lives are right now, we need to have some reality thrown in to remind us that life is life, and there’s always gonna be some shit in the good.

That’s enough of that though. I want to touch on the things I’ve loved about this trip. A lot of that has to do with the places I’ve imagined visiting for most of my life, as well as the really simple moments.

The one constant thing that keeps me happy is waking up every single morning. Which is kind of hilarious for me to be saying, or even feeling, since I am NOT a morning person at all. Ask any of my close friends, getting me up before 7 or even 8 am is a slight mission. Not that we ever really wake up too early– it kind of just depends on where we are, what we’ve been doing. Sometimes you forget how exhausted driving and setting up makes you, and then you sleep for 10-12 hours and it’s a bit of a shock, like oh, I really needed that. But I can honestly say that I wake up each morning, in our tiny little bed, and look around the ambulance and I feel so damn happy to be there. It doesn’t even matter that we’re parked on the side of the road, we’re somewhere completely different and we can do anything we please. It’s even better when you wake up and it’s raining– like it was this morning. The pitter-patter makes crawling out of bed a little bit more difficult.

Making coffee and breakfast is the other simple treat that keeps me smiling. Even though it’s not always simple– we have to set up the gas stove, general prep isn’t easy and neither are the dishes– but I enjoy nothing more than cooking up our breaky this way, it’s just more satisfying somehow. Abel and I pretty much alternate each morning whose turn it is to brew the hot pot of jo. We’ve talked about how we really love either end of that– I love getting coffee made for me while I’m still snuggled in bed, but I also love making it for Abel and watching him enjoy the steamy cup whilst tucked in. The simple things.

 

As for places, we’ve been to quite a few in the past few months. Sometimes I feel like we’re speeding along and then I stop and look back over the course of the week and think shit, that felt like a fucking month ago… how did we even get to this point? Time operates differently on a road trip.

I want to talk about how much we loved Philadelphia, but it’s kind of hard to, based on the incident that occurred there. Abel and I were really keen to check this city out. My Nan and all of her family are from Philly, so I feel like that’s kind of where some of my roots are– my Dad was born there. Abel and I also love the show It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia. For anyone who doesn’t know it, it’s basically just a group of fucking idiots doing stupid, dickhead stuff all the time. Very intelligent humour.

Anyway, this got us really pumped for Philly. We spent the first part of our day exploring around the city centre, there were beautiful Christmas markets sprawling the open complex areas and we felt that holiday cheer beginning to creep on us. Rain splattered down as we enjoyed a German beer at the market, so we made a plan to head back towards the Ambo and grab a bite and a drink. After having a couple drinks and playing some pool before our food came out, I was starting to feel a little queasy– not highly unusual for me, I have a weak belly. After dinner, I was ready to call it quits. But it was a Saturday night and Abel was fairly intent on drinking.

 

He begged and dragged me to a cider bar. Which was awesome, I usually find that cider isn’t as common over here and I love nothing more than knocking back a cold, dry apple cider. We had a couple drinks each and then we tried the flight of different ciders, than we had another to ourselves. I thought we’d go home after this bar, but Abel had a specific location in mind. Maps up on his phone, he zeroed in and took me on a little journey to a certain street he remembered seeing. Turning the corner onto this street, I recognised it immediately. “This is from the opening of It’s Always Sunny! Look at the lights!”

I must say, life was different as soon as you walked down this street– things were happening, people were about. On the surrounding roads, there was the occasional sweet restaurant or boutique bar, but the vibe was unlike this one. Colours shined bright, people poured out of shops and bars, they lingered on the streets dressed in incredible attire, homeless men sat humbly with their dogs. Abel and I shared a glance and a giggle and thought yep, this is where it’s happening. We made our way into a bar that was fairly busy and Abel was immediately content. “This is what I wanted– to be in a real Philly bar, just like It’s Always Sunny.” The top of the drink menu said: $5 MARGARITAS. ALL DAY, EVERY DAY. Sold. We had one, and then another, and then things went a little pear-shaped. I remember talking at length with a guy chowing down on a burger next to us. He told us about how liberal Philly is, how he spent his whole life here, how much he hated Trump etc. I remember making friends with a group of women in their 30s to my right. They laughed at how young I was, saying they had kids my age– but they shared their penis straws with me and stood up for me when the barmaid cut me off after I spilled my second margarita. Fair enough. Then she kicked me out and Abel proceeded to call her “Dee” (It’s Always Sunny character) and tell her to chill out– fairly certain she didn’t hear it or catch on. Things went hazy after that. I remember walking out of the bar and struggling to keep my eyes open.

Fast forwards a few hours and I woke up in the ambulance, fully dressed with a throbbing palm and lip. Abel stirred and said, “can you please grab me a pillow?” It appeared he hadn’t been using one.

“Sure. Where’s yours?” I responded.

“I threw up on it.” Oh. “When did you throw up?” I asked.

“Right after you did.” Well, that was news to me. I have no recollection of that happening. For a while I drifted in and out of sleep and I slowly became aware that the red stuff on my sheets wasn’t blood from my hand, but it was vomit. Great, I was laying in Abel’s vomit. Turns out I had it in my hair too. I arose not too long later and noticed that Abel’s shoes on the floor to my left were covered in vomit. It was definitely mine, and I don’t need to explain how I knew that.

“I am so confused about what happened. How did we get here and why is my hand cut open?”

Abel then told me about how I had tripped over a bike on our walk home. I have a vague memory of falling and biting my lip. Another memory attempted to form: a burning sensation rising in my throat. Trying to think about the night before made me want to be sick again.

That entire Sunday was spent cleaning vomit from the ambulance and sitting in a laundromat for three hours as we washed all our bedding, sheets and any vomit covered clothes.

We shouldn’t be allowed alcoholic beverages, and we’ve been mostly tame since that incident. There was no further sight seeing to be had in Philly. Instead, we dozed in our clean bed, parked on the side of a main road, as it continued to rain and be gloomy.

Despite the incident that caused a lot of pain– pain that continued in the coming weeks as I dealt with an infected and healing hand wound– Philly is one of my favourite places we’ve been.

We actually got to go to an Amish market on our way out there. This is something I’ve wanted to do for a really long time. It was not as I expected it to be. To be fair, it was probably better. But you know, I envisioned a barn with some tables of assorted goods and everything to be sold in cash. This Amish market was located in a shopping complex, like where you’d find a grocery store, a bank, a pet shop and a hairdressers. It was an enormous set out market with separate vendors; fruit & veg, a bakery, meat, cheese, health, lollies, etc. Everything was perfect. Picture perfect; the stuff you see in magazines and think nothing looks that good in real life. Here, it existed and it was real and every single thing we bought was mouth-watering.

I was perplexed by the Amish people though. We studied Amish communities during Society and Culture in year 11 and I expected them to be…more old-fashioned, I suppose. Some of them were wearing crocs. CROCS! They were using credit card machines, and when my card had a bit of an issue, the young Amish girl spoke to me like she was very in-tune with the modern technologies of payment. Sure, this would be learned from working in a place like this, but they just felt so close to modern technology that I was a little baffled about how “old-school” they actually are.

 

My next favourite place was Salem, Massachusetts. Which is funny because we had another incident there. I won’t flesh it out like I did with Philly– it’s not nearly as interesting. To put it briefly, we woke up there on our first morning with all four of our car batteries not just flat, but completely dead. It took us a while to realise that’s what was going on. The car had to be towed and spend the night in the shop. While this was not something our budget really had room for, it allowed us to spend a night at the Salem Inn and escape the negative temperatures.

Salem is known for the witch trials that happened there in the 1600s. I have been fascinated by witches since I was a little girl. I dressed up as one multiple times for Halloween (being an October baby, I always had Halloween birthday parties too). I loved the anime movie, Kiki’s Delivery Service. I thought there was one living in my closet for the better part of my childhood. Whenever I was being a little brat, my Mum used to call me “witchy poo”– I think she still wants to a lot of the time.

Regardless, I was intrigued by the historical events in Salem and was super keen to learn all about it. Our original plan had us visiting Salem in October, possibly over Halloween. We learned while we were there that October in Salem is complete mayhem– you can barely walk. It’s amazing, but crowded. In some ways, I was grateful we didn’t make it there until December.

We’d spent all day dealing with the car, but we made it to check-in at the Salem Inn just in time for our haunted and historical walking tour of the town. This went for just about two hours and was incredible. Our tour guide was especially spectacular; she told each and every story with such conviction, passion and expression– and there were only four of us! You couldn’t help but be glued to her face.

The funny thing is, the Salem witch trials only lasted for 1 year… back in the 1600s. One year in Salem’s history and this city is known as “the witch city”. Police cars have witches on them, lots of signs for different business have a witch or a cat or broomstick incorporated somehow. Modern day witchcraft shops litter the city. Modern day witchcraft is real and not evil and to be totally honest with you, I’m thinking of converting. Converting from the religion I do not have to join Wicca. Basically they believe in lots of natural stuff, things to do with the seasons and astrology and their “gods” are both male and female– neither gender dominates. It sounds pretty radical. I will continue to read up on it.

 

Salem has such an epic history aside from the witch trials. They were totally interesting and a really huge part of the city’s history– 20 something innocent people were killed and this has lead to a huge part of the city’s identity today. Not to mention, these people were not actually witches. If something was not explained by God, then it was the devil’s work and was witchcraft. If you were different, a social outcast or a spinster, you were a witch. Salem is 400 years old though, so a lot happened in this place apart from the trials. It was a wealthy area, a shipping port for 80 years prior to the trials. Many of the buildings built back then, still stand. A couple 100 years before Australia was “founded” aka invaded by white men. The old Town Hall and derby square consists of these original buildings. Our tour guide told us stories that happened in our exact standing location, 300-400 years earlier. Many buildings in Salem are haunted and while I’ve been skeptical at times, I am not completely opposed to ghost stories. I genuinely believed most of what she told us about recurring ghosts in certain town buildings. It just kind of makes sense to me.

Salem is stunning because of these ancient buildings and the rich history made it a really exciting place to explore.

This grand boulevard is Chestnut Street. The wealthiest street in Salem in the 1800s and still is today. People would to elegant parties here. Some of these mansions are selling for $700k. Below the average house price in Gerringong… crazy.

The original Town Hall. Scenes from Hocus Pocus were filmed on the top storey.

The Salem Inn, where we stayed. So beautiful and cosy, with a fireplace. Apparently a ghost cat lives here. Wished I’d seen it. 

 

There’s a little bit about our experience with some of the places and moments I’ve longed for. I’ve realised I’m not always going to be writing or story-telling consecutively. You’re gonna get little snippets here and there and some might have more to do with a theme. These are just some of the moments or times on our trip that have made me really happy. They’re some of the times that I already find myself looking back on often.

It’s funny though, because I really wanted to keep this post on a positive note, ya know. Really highlight some of the greater moments, the better places etc. (even though Philly and Salem are tainted with a bit of error, they’ve been two of my favourites) and since beginning to write it, we’ve had all these funny/weird/shitty things happen and that’s all that’s been playing on my mind. The irony, hey.

I’ll tell y’all about that in good time.

PS. I knew I picked up accents easily– mine has been a serious Aussie-US hybrid since our arrival– but now we’re in the dirty south and I sound like a full-blown southerner at times. Lawd, help me.

 

A.

THE THINGS I’VE LEARNT WHILE LIVING ON THE ROAD

Living life on the road teaches you so many different kinds of lessons. First off, I am just enormously grateful that I’ve allowed myself to have this opportunity (haha yeah, I am grateful for my own decisions I guess?). The daily pressures and what’s viewed as “acceptable” or “the norm” definitely differs from Australia to the USA. Back home in Aus, we are encouraged to get out and see the world and leave the adult stuff on the back burner for as long as possible. That’s not to say we’re not told we need to grow up, fend for ourselves and get a job– don’t get me wrong, those things are all voiced to us, we’re not merely encouraged to avoid adulthood responsibilities. But, we are told to experience things now, while we’re younger and have less of those adult “chores” looming above. It’s ok for us to take a year off from work, if we’ve saved hard and are pursuing something more enriching than sitting in a cubicle from 8-7, but only getting paid 9-5.

I’ve just noticed how many older people we meet who are blown away by what we’re doing, whereas I feel that back home, our type of trip is somewhat more common. People work, save, take time off and travel. Or they work and travel (I did/do both!). Because waking up somewhere different each day, experiencing new landscapes, new people, new food, it’s all just a bit more exciting than tying myself down right now. So instead of experiencing the pressure so many of my American friends felt as soon as they graduated from college, I felt reassured in my decision to take time off from life and live it in a different way for a little while. Yes, many people we meet are shocked, but they often seem jealous that either they didn’t do this or they didn’t allow their kids to, when really, it would have been the best option for so many people.

Aside from all that, there are more practical things I’ve learned from living out of van (or ambulance in our case)– the simple things you have to be prepared for.

  1. Running water is a serious necessity we take for granted every day. Second to just water. At the beginning of our journey, it wasn’t too much of a problem. We often parked at beach carparks that had showers and taps or at campgrounds. This made filling up our water bottles and washing our dishes rather easy. But then things got colder, many of these public showers and taps have been drained and switched off for the season– or they’re just not as accessible anymore.

Since we try to cook as much as possible to save money (generally breakfast and dinner and we’ll have an Arbonne protein shake for lunch which has been a HUGE money, time and health saver) this means dishes are often to follow. My advice is to try your best to find a running water source, it’s just easier and cleaner and more economical. In the negative temperatures (which we are most certainly in) it’s not always pleasant, because if running water is a simple luxury, you can bet your ass that hot running water is for the royals and elite.

So my hot tip if you don’t have access to running water and don’t want dirty dishes piling up in your limited space: paper towel and lysol wipes. Not entirely the best option for the environment, so limit this as much as you can. When you boil water for your hot morning beverage of choice (coffee, always coffee), boil some extra. Use this to give a simple, start clean to the more filthy pans ie. Abel’s bacon. Wipe over the rest of the pans/dishes with paper towel to be rid of gunk, lysol wipes come next to disinfect that shit, and then unfortunately you’ll have to use more paper towel to dry and remove any disinfectant. You can pretty much ensure that one piece will get all the drying done however. Like I said, not the most environmentally conscious way of doing things, but it will make your life a whole lot easier when running water is just not available to you.

In warmer temperatures we will be more likely to boil water and use a hot, soapy filled container to wash our dishes. Cause we’ll be more likely to get out the van then too.

2. You will not always be waking up to a beautiful sight. I mean, yes, we try our best to find free overnight parking, or just non-limited parking somewhere pretty. For us, this usually means in front of a body of water or a nice park/reserve. But often, in the nice, more populated towns, parking near the water is expensive, limited, or purely residential. In the city, you can’t be fussy with parking because it’s best to find something as close as possible to the main attractions that will let you stay all day long.

When we were in Washington DC parking was a serious struggle. On our first day, we parked the car at a metre with a two-hour limit, and began walking a decent trek to the National Museum of Natural History. This took close to 20 minutes, which didn’t bother us, but we realised how limited our time at the museum was gonna be and that just wasn’t an option. We ended up walking back, moved the car and came back into the city via uber so we wouldn’t be restricted. We stayed at a campground just out of the city and figured we’d get an uber in each day– but this was $20 each way and the uber wouldn’t even be able to get out to the campground– we were positioned up a long, winding road well into the State park. We had to drive to a McDonald’s nearby and then request an uber. Bit of an effort, you see.

After that whole situation, when we were in Philadelphia, we managed to find street parking that was free from 6pm-8am. Score. This means your sleeping on the side of the road, however. Not a big deal, but be prepared for noisy traffic most of the evening and early morning. We’re lucky with the ambulance– the windows are seriously tinted, we have lots of curtains/shields we put up, and not a single person is aware that anyone is in there, let alone two living out of it.

Sleeping on the side of the road does limit you in a few ways though. Not just the lack of running water situation that I mentioned earlier, but also…

3. Lack of public restrooms. Same deal with the public running water, not a huge issue in the beginning of our trip when we were in warmer, coastal areas and beach showers/toilets are always open. But as you travel up north or into more densely populated areas you will notice how these become less frequent. Most shops and restaurants have hand-written signs, plastered in their front windows, “NO PUBLIC RESTROOMS”. So you make note of the Starbucks, McDonald’s, Dunkin’ Donuts, and gas/petrol stations littered across the area. If possible, try and park near or at one so you have access to these somewhat clean bathrooms.

Aside from that, my advice to you: don’t be afraid to become one with nature. In more simple terms: don’t be afraid to pop a squat. Again, much easier in warmer weather, parked in secluded areas with natural scenery happening around you. It’s easy to squat in a hidden bush to do your business (I’m talking strictly number one’s here by the way. Kudos to anyone who is game enough to go beyond that, because I’m certainly not). But when the public restrooms and easy-squat locations aren’t at your disposal, here’s what I suggest (many of you will be opposed): pee. in. a. cup.

I can’t believe I’m writing so publicly about this and truly raving for it’s cause, but it’s the greatest thing I ever started doing. Again, not entirely environmentally economical as you have to use disposable cups. So the better option is to source some biodegradable ones, or better yet, invest in a she-wee. I’ve never even thought of that until now, but I’m seriously considering doing a little Amazon search. Why not? Life will be cleaner, easier, and you can bet your ass there are no secrets between Abel and I anymore. Oh well, we’ve been a pretty close couple from the get-go anyway.

4. You will not always be relaxing. I find myself searching for some R&R. I have not written or read nearly as many books as I would have liked so far on this journey. That’s ok, but you just have to be aware that it’s something you need to make time for. So often we are thinking about where we’ll be next, what our “plan of action” is for the day or the next few days. We’re waking up, trying to find a Planet Fitness to workout and shower at, and then we’re either driving or exploring. Daylight savings is well and truly over here, and honestly, the sky fades to purple around 4:30pm and creeps its way to complete darkness within the next half hour. Early dinners are usually part of our routine, but to be fair, we don’t really have much of a routine and I guess, that’s why we don’t always have lots of relaxing time. The times we have felt most relaxed is when we are spending a few nights at a campground. We can let our guard down there and time is our friend. When you’re sleeping in some of the not-so-beautiful places, ie. the side of the road or carpark, you kind of just want to get things done.

Although each day is ours and we are in control of how we choose to spend our time, I still feel like we run out of it often. But then there are the days that I read for hours on end– usually in a low key town, on a rainy or cloudy day.

I’m not saying I don’t love my life right now, I definitely do. I just want to emphasise that this kind of lifestyle can be tiring, taxing and you won’t always have the energy to do the things that relax you. It’s important that we set aside time for R&R, no matter what kind of life you’re leading at the time. Otherwise you’ll get frustrated, grumpy and end up snapping at your travel-buddy. It never feels good when you take your own shit out on someone else, so it’s imperative to know when that’s going to happen and to do something about it.

Like the other week when Abel had his life altering revelation, “I’ve realised I get really grumpy when I’m hungry.” I’m sorry, what? You only just realised this? I’ve known for the past 3.5 years.

It’s funny how we notice some things about ourselves and are oblivious to others.

 

Apart from all the amazing places we’ve been to, the exciting things we’ve done, the hiccups we’ve had, all in all, I have just learned so much in a really small period of time. Like, we’ve only been gone for 3 months. What am I going to learn in the next 8?! Bring it on.

 

I’ll be back sooner rather than later. I’d love to hear what YOU guys want to hear about.

A

MEMORABLE PLACES AND MEMORABLE PEOPLE

Our road trip is well underway and we’ve passed through a total of five states now. Safe to say Abel has seen more of the USA then some Americans. The ambulance is forever a conversation starter and we’ve met all kinds of people. Some sweet, heart-warming souls that really love and appreciate what we’re doing, and then there are the few odd balls. They keep it interesting though and are, unfortunately, the people we’ll remember the most.

 

Here’s a bit about some of the hot-stops so far and some of the individuals we’ve encountered:

Ocala National Forest, Florida

This was actually our first stop and a very memorable one. We spent two nights at a campground alongside Lake Dorr (not for swimming unfortunately– discovered this after a long, sweaty car trip). That first night we learnt the hard way: the sun went down quickly, just as we had finished cooking and the heat meant that a flock of mosquitos (hundreds, if not thousands) swarmed us and the inside of our ambo. The humidity is absolutely unbearable in that thing and normally, we would open the doors wide, hang up our mossy nets and sleep with a breeze… but, there’s actually bears in Florida. That was a real shock to us. Upon our arrival, the camp host greeted us with an information sheet about how to keep the bears away. Bear proof bins and food containers were provided on site, but since we had an enclosed vehicle that was fine– we just had to put up with a hot box and hope no bears would crawl into our area to give our van a little rumble.

 

The following day we journeyed further into the national park to Alexander Springs. This was a major highlight, we were ready to dip into some refreshing water. First walking down towards the spring, just to the side of the boat ramp was an “alligator” warning sign. We had been curious about this, but since no one mentioned a thing we figured there would be no large lizards. Immediately, we questioned whether we could swim and our hearts began to sink a little– after that sticky night’s sleep, we needed a dip. Over to the right of the sign and past a little grass patch, we could see some people swimming. Snorkelling, in fact. Just beyond the alligator warning sign, out along the surface of the spring, lay a long rope/net contraption. We assumed this was to keep the alligators away, but how effective and reliable it was, we weren’t too sure. I’d read online that this area was designated for swimming and snorkelling , so with other people frolicking on the netted side, we took the risk.

The phrase “crystal clear” has never really meant anything until now. If an alligator was near or at a distance, you would certainly see it coming. This water was like glass, recently sprayed with windex and wiped away with a clean cloth. Up the back to the far right of the spring, was a large turquoise-coloured area. It stood out like a diamond in the rough. Except the “rough” wasn’t really rough at all. More like, a really large, more-sparkly diamond, among other diamonds. We waded towards it and the temperature and floor dropped simultaneously. A subtle current flowed from the north and flushed throughout the area, a 3-metre crater sprawling below us. It didn’t look that deep, until Abel swam down beneath me and his figure continued to shrink as he kicked further and further.

 

Kayaks were available for hire and we had a few hours to kill after taking a walk through the woods. To be honest, we reached a landing and saw a few kayakers paddling past. When I asked the woman if they’d seen any alligators she said, “Oh not me, but my husband did. I saw lots of turtles and an otter though.” An otter!!!!! Sold.

We took the double kayak into the “alligator” warning section of the spring (the only section you were allowed to kayak in) and made the paddle up towards the bridge. It was definitely freaky knowing the alligators were somewhere in that water, but our minds were fairly at ease. Abel had asked one of the park rangers and he said they weren’t very big. Plus, if they were a real risk to the people (the sign actually said alligators are scared of “man”) they wouldn’t promote kayaking in those sections of the spring. The lady told us to avoid the reeds, that’s mainly where they hang out. It took a little while and a keen eye, but we eventually saw one, and then another, and a few more after that. I couldn’t help but continue to call them “crocs” and that just makes them sound way more frightening. For the most part, they hung low by the reeds, and you saw their heads and backs protruding through the water’s surface. Once we saw one crossing the spring, a good 10-metres in front of us. Lots of turtles, lots of fish, and even a bear! A baby black bear climbed a tree to our left and we gasped/squealed multiple times in half a minute. It was fleeting though, so no photos captured of that. And no otters. That would’ve made my day.

 

(look close to see gator)

(look close again– gator on log)

 

That night back at the campground we met Rich. An older man, I believe in his 70s, who came over to, of course, talk to us about our ambulance. He was staying at the campsite across from his and was visiting his mate in the one adjacent. He kept saying “good for you guys, good for you guys” as his hands patted down the top of his jaundice-grey ponytail. Rich used to work for a big corporate company but made the quit about 30 years ago. His boss offered him a promotion and he told him to go stick it up his ass. You wouldn’t think your boss would be very impressed with that kind of attitude, but they had drinks later that night and his boss told him how envious he was that Rich had the guts to do something like that. Now Rich works as an “art dealer”, per say. He “caught the wanderlust” and moves around the country in his trailer RV, buying cheap antique art from flea markets and re-selling it at flea markets around the country. To be honest, it sounds like he makes a butt-load of money. Turns out most of the people at the campground all knew each other, all here for the local antique fair. Good on ’em.

 

Pit-stop before our next few destinations was… Disney World, Orlando.

We kind of tossed up going for a little while. Mainly because Abel wasn’t the slightest bit interested, but it has been my dream to go since I was a little girl. I’m a massive Disney fan and I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to fulfil my five-year old dreams (let’s be honest, it was still my dream) of meeting Ariel and Minnie Mouse. They were honestly my heroes. I have my baby Minnie Mouse who’s been everywhere with me, to hell and back. She’s had a tough ride; losing a tale, and her hat (Mum sewed that back on, on more than one occasion), and her nose is discoloured, but she’s still a little cutie to me. I dressed up as Minnie on my 4th? birthday, and had a Minnie Mouse cake. I had Minnie Mouse towel. The Little Mermaid… I couldn’t tell you how many times I’ve watched that movie. Not only as a little girl, but a lot in my teen years. If I was sad, The Little Mermaid, if I was hungover, The Little Mermaid, if I had my period, The Little Mermaid. And also when I was happy and just felt like it, too. I used to have a Little Mermaid toilet seat, suit case, sleeping bag, and heaps of other stuff. You get the picture.

Abel pretty much knew that, even though I said we didn’t have to go because tickets were $122 each (!!!!) plus we’d spend a lot more, he couldn’t take this away from me. So off we went, we spent the big bucks on tickets, parking, food was actually pretty cheap, and we didn’t buy a lot at the gift shop (The Little Mermaid journal for me, plus we were in need of a new keychain, a simple ‘A’ that has Minnie, Mickey and Goofy on it).

 

I want to say it was worth it, but… there were things that let me down. Things I probably knew were going to happen, but I’d pushed them to the back of my mind. For one, the lines. Every single ride or attraction had the wait time posted out the front, some saying “90 minutes”. Granted, this wasn’t always the case. Abel agreed to stand in line for me to meet Ariel when the wait time said “55 Minutes”. We waited maybe 20, so not terrible. I giggled like a nervous little girl when I sat next to her. She asked what my sunglasses were because, “we don’t have these under the sea”. Oh, Ariel, you’re hilarious.

The rides were all fairly tame– not that Abel or I can handle intense rides, but I would have tried some riskier ones. I kind of forgot that the entire park is uh, really aimed at little kids.

But the one thing that really disappointed me was the lack of characters roaming the park. I was always under the impression that different characters from all the movies would be wandering around in costume and in character, ready for a chat and photo at a minutes notice. This was not the case. All the major characters had their own attractions that you had to line up in to get your picture taken. Maybe this is only the case at Disney Land in California? Or perhaps the characters were getting swarmed and attacked by small children, I don’t know. But it wasn’t what I was expecting.

 

We stopped for single nights at a couple places on the way to my Nan’s house in South Carolina. New Smryna Beach, FL (apparently major shark territory, we learned this after the fact that we went swimming at dusk post-Disney World. Woops), St. Augustine, FL, Brunswick, GA.

The only exciting thing to report from this section of the journey, was our encounter with Grizzly in St. Augustine. This place was pretty, on the water, but it was grey and cool when we were there. So, not a lot to do. We decided to spend the night at beach carpark, which is often the safest and easiest option. We had tried to get a site at the state park right near by, but we just missed out. After cooking dinner and doing the washing, the sun had just settled in for the night, so we were getting ready to do the same. A big truck pulls in, with a row of yellow lights on the top. At first, we think this is a cop or a ranger, but it’s not. Just a big man, with a big white beard and a camo bandana tied around his head. He sits in his car for a while, and I’m very aware of his presence. Then he goes for a wander on the beach. On his way back towards his truck, I see him watching us pack our things away. He slowly walks over and starts making conversation, once again, about the ambulance. I start to calm down and think, he looks scary, but I’m sure he’s fine. I’m sitting in the side of the ambulance, blocking the entrance with my legs, as I put the dishes away. Abel stands beside him in the doorframe as he chats with us. The conversation moves from our travels to his former job as tour bus driver. Apparently he toured with Metallica, Pearl Jam, The Rolling Stones and heaps of other well-known bands. So that’s pretty cool. I notice he’s whacking a long black thing into his right palm. I’m thinking, Fuck, is that a baton? This dude is huge and weird. Abel and I are trying to close the chat and get him away from our van. I only notice that it’s a torch (flashlight), when a helicopter flies over head with a spotlight on the beach, and Grizzly begins yelling at it, flashing his torch in it’s direction. Then he asks us if we’re planning to spend the night here, Abel and I kind of glance at each other, hesitate and say, “Yeeeeeeah, we think so…”

He says, “Ah I don’t know if I would. There’s a lot of weirdos around here. A lot of weird shit happens in this area at night time, like lots of weird shit. Just because it borders on the state park, ya know? I’m a bit of a safety guy. If I was you, I’d head down near the plaza on the main strip and just park near the bank. You shouldn’t have any trouble there.”

This is coming from the guy who just made several racist comments and told us we need to get a gun. I’m thinking the spotlight was searching for him. So, of course we decided not to stay there. But we also didn’t want to go and stay exactly where he told us to. Unfortunately, our ambulance is very recognisable. You can see her from hundreds of yards away. We ended up parking in a public lot on the main street where there were lots of witnesses around. I felt safer. I’m sure Grizzly was harmless, but when he shook our hands and said his name as he departed, I wasn’t so convinced.

 

Since then, we did a day trip to Savannah, GA on the way to my Nan’s house in Bluffton, SC where we stayed for a few nights. Then we made our way to visit Kelsey in Wilmington, NC with a pit-stop in Charleston, SC.

Savannah is such a beautiful little city. Quaint, old, and jam packed with lots of character. Cobblestone streets and building lining the waterfront. Funky art galleries and the most impressive antique bookshop I’ve ever been to, Books on Bay. This woman’s collection was out of this world. Hundreds of Nancy Drew’s (I couldn’t help myself, I bought some very old, limited-edition “twin” sets, the first four stories in two books). But she had collections worth hundreds of dollars in this store, some thousands. Shakespeare’s dating back to the 1800’s.

 

It was so lovely to see my Nan after five years, even though so much time passes between our visits, she’s still the same and I’ll forever feel extremely comfortable in her presence. In the earlier years of my life, her and my Grandad lived directly across the road from us. I spent countless hours at their house. Being in her house, that I’ve never been to be for, felt totally familiar– she still has lots of the same furniture and decorations. Even the same dining room chairs.

Nan took us into Beaufort, SC for the day and it was stunning. Right on the water, with huge southern styled houses all around. I forgot how enormous the houses can be here. They’re antiques and have so much character to them.

 

 

Our weekend with Kelsey was so special. For Abel especially, I am sure. We’ve spent the past two months hopping around the country and visiting my family, I know he would’ve been missing his own. It was also just comforting to be around an Australian. Although I’m both, I’ve done so much of my developing and growing back in Aus, so that’s what I identify with the most. We had a good laugh talking about things Aussies say vs. the yankee lingo.

(Wilmington has the most incredible sunsets)

Our first night we got unexpectedly drunk. We started the evening with a few wines and nibbles on the beach. We were supposed to mosey into town to get some dinner and drinks, but the first bar we went into had double vodka red-bulls for $10. Say no more. Free buffalo wings with every round too, so we got some food in our bellies. Abel, the man constantly buying rounds (even when no one has finished their previous drink) is the one to blame here, I think. We were pretty dusty the next day, but we had a good explore of Wilmington and their annual Riverfest was on which made the town really light up.

Abel and I headed a bit further north after that to Beaufort, NC where we spent two nights and did a whole lot of nothing. The town was beautiful, quiet, right on the water with lots of boats. All the parking along the main strip at the water front was free and with no “no overnight parking” signs. We felt safe to set up here. I almost didn’t want to leave.

 

 

The Outer Banks is made up of a couple of long, thing islands that run parallel with the North Carolina coastline. Scattered with weatherboard houses, towering up to four storeys high. It’s home to the tallest lighthouse in America, at Cape Hatteras, and “arguably the most recognisable”. I’ve been there a couple of times with my family, but not since I was really little. My dad had suggested we go here after Wilmington and it worked out really well. I was pretty unsure of what we were going to do for Thanksgiving or where we were going to be. I was convinced we’d be eating out for the feast, at Denny’s or something. My Nan had told me her brother Bobby, his wife Rosemary, their kids Michele and Nick (my Dad’s cousins), their partners and children all hire a house out every year at the Outer Banks for Thanksgiving. She made a few calls and organised for us to join them so we wouldn’t spend it alone. I’m really so thankful she did, because I haven’t seen this part of my family since I was maybe, nine years old, at my great-grandmother’s 90th birthday (Mimi’s still kicking by the way, 105! Can you believe it?), and that was probably one of the only times I’d ever met them.

They welcomed us into their home with open arms, made us feel so comfortable, allowing us to spend a night inside, use their showers and do some laundry. Plus they put on a damn good feast. We couldn’t have been more grateful for their hospitality, they’re such a lovely bunch of people.

 

Now we’re spending our second night in Virginia at campground in the First Landing State Park. We washed dishes in a basin with hot water for this first time and cooked our meal over an open fire last night. Great luxuries for us.

 

I’ll be back to talk more about how we’re travelling van-life wise.

Until then,

Like. Comment. Share with your friends.

 

A

HOW I’M MAKING $ ON THE ROAD WITH SOMETHING I BELIEVE IN

Even though I was saving relentlessly for a good 6-12 months in preparation for our big trip, expenses are constant at times and your bank account will continue to do anything but go up. Unless, you decide to do something about it. Of course, I will persist with my writing– that is a life-long endeavour, engrained in who I am and I’ll never turn away from it–but why not promote something else that I have an invested passion in. Health and beauty.

Anyone who knows me well, knows I talk a lot about skincare. I love effective products, something that will help someone, change their life and build confidence. For me, these products need to be naturally based, botanically derived. Mother Nature provides us with an abundance of plants that have so many beneficial properties, why wouldn’t we use them to help us?

Not just skincare, but makeup too. It’s shocking how many cosmetic brands are not vegan. Many of you meat-eaters (myself included) might think, ok well who cares? But do you really want to put ANIMAL LARD on your skin? Nasty. And totally not good for your pores.

The first time I heard about Arbonne was five years ago on my last visit to the USA. A close family friend of ours, Kaitlin, was starting her business with them. I bought a primer and the calm facial cleanser and was blown away but how good they were. At this time, nutrition was a part of Arbonne, but not the major way it is now. Fast forward a couple of years, back home in Australia, my best friend Olivia was starting her own business with Arbonne. I hosted a party for Olivia’s ‘opening’ day and was able to get so many goodies because so many of our friends made purchases. I’ve continued to buy their makeup ever since.

Earlier this year I saw Kaitlin posting a lot of information about a healthy living program, a 30 day detox through Arbonne. The whole idea really tickled my fancy. I started a “wellness” journey about 18 months ago– clean eating, regular exercise, yoga and meditation– and thought this detox would be such a wonderful companion to my new lifestyle. The main thing about the detox is, while weight loss is one of the many benefits, it’s not the goal. It’s about flushing the toxins from your organs, cleaning your insides, resulting in better concentration and so many other benefits. Honestly, the list is enormous:

At the time I was seeing all of Kaitlin’s posts, our trip was slowly approaching and it just didn’t seem a feasible option for me. I was very focused on limiting my spendings, but mostly figured trying to follow any kind of program would be too difficult and disjointed while moving from place to place. Maybe this would’ve been the case in the first few weeks of our travels, but now that we’re on the road, my diet is mostly back to normal and exercise is regular.

Just last week I got a message from Kaitlin. I had not long visited with her in Connecticut and she knew at some point, I would be feeling the pinch in my savings and wanting to make some money. That aside, she knew I cared about health and skincare and saw Arbonne as a great opportunity for me. I am so grateful to her because without Arbonne I wouldn’t have developed such a deep understanding for the health benefits of the 30 day to healthy living program, on top of the skincare and cosmetics (which I can already vouch for. The results are undeniable; phenomenal).

My detox package will be arriving today (hooray!) and I cannot wait for Abel and I to get started on this health journey while on the road. This entire trip has been, and will continue to be, a fantastic opportunity for us to focus on ourselves from the inside out. Staying fit and healthy while always experiencing something new– I can’t think of anything better.

Obviously the detox functions best when applied alongside a clean diet and moderate exercise, but if that’s not something embedded in your repertoire, we provide meal plans and constant guidance and support.

Please reach out to me at any time if this is something that interests you. I think we can all honestly tick off at least two of the issues on the list posted above and why wouldn’t you decide to be a part of something that can fix that? You will have more energy, increased concentration and your physical performance will be enhanced.

If you’re having skin issues or the products your currently using aren’t quite cutting it, again, contact me. We have ranges for sensitive skin, dry skin, acne, evening skin tone, anti-ageing etc.

If you’re currently using non-vegan makeup, I would really recommend changing that. Our range offers light, full-coverage makeup, that will be an absolute treat to your skin.

OR contact me if you’re looking for an incredible way to make money from home or on the road. There’s nothing more exhilarating than funding your lifestyle while promoting life-changing products to your friends and strangers, too. Back when I first heard of Arbonne, the business consisted of hosting parties to promote the products, but it has changed and evolved so much to keep up with the times. Now, you can do this kind of work form anywhere and it truly is for everyone.

Consider changing your life from the inside out– your body will thank you for it!

 

 

HOW WE CAME TO BUY AN AMBULANCE, THAT WE’RE GONNA LIVE IN

That’s right, we bought an ambulance.

It’s not a fully functioning one, as many have questioned, but the lights and sirens do in fact work. Although, we have yet to try them out, apparently they’re rather loud– and illegal. The inside has been gutted and set up as a camper. Before I tell you all about our funky new vehicle, I’ll back-track a little to our entire car-hunt in general.

Abel and I had been browsing online, craigslist mainly, for used campervans, RVs, conversion vans etc. In the weeks leading up to our departure it seemed like we were constantly coming across good finds. Low prices, low miles, lots of potential. A whole variety of things would pop up and we’d think, that could be the one. Then of course, as is often the case, many hiccups and mishaps stopped these “good finds” from becoming “good buys”.

About a week before we left, I emailed a woman about a campervan she was selling. It seemed perfect: not too big, completely fitted out and self-contained, only $7k. Her reply said something like this:

Hey Annika, the van is still available. I am selling because my husband passed away recently and I don’t use it much anymore. I am actually away at the moment, and the van is located in Indiana. I would like to do the sale through ebay because they are more reliable and have never let me down. The process is quite simple. You just need to make a down payment of $2000 and I will have the van sent by courier to where you are (it will take 5 days-a week). You have 5 days to inspect the van and make sure you’re happy with it. If not, you may send it back and I will refund your deposit. If all looks good with you, you can complete your payment and the courier service will provide you with the title transfer details. Let me know if this interests you and I will create a private ebay link to send to you.

How good does that sound, right? I summoned Abel over, summarised the email and he said, yep, let’s do it. I definitely wanted some more details before providing this lady with a deposit, so I asked for the VIN and a bit more information on how the van itself runs. Other than that, we thought it was pretty much sorted. I showed lots of people photos and had my fingers crossed it would all work out. Guess crossing your fingers does fuck all, because this was nothing but a heavy-weighted scam. I can thank my mum and her friend Denise for making me think carefully before signing a deal with devil. Mum sent me a link to some articles about campervan scams on the internet. Apparently there’s a HUGE market for it. If it wasn’t such an awful thing to do to someone, it would almost be a really great way to make some quick cash… almost. The article listed some pretty basic warning signs:

  • The sale is usually linked to some kind of tragedy (this lady’s “dead” husband)
  • They often say they are out of town
  • They will provide a courier service
  • They would like a down payment
  • They would like to do the sale through ebay

This lady pretty much ticked every box with gusto. I was hoping she would prove me wrong, and after asking for the VIN (for the 4th or 5th time) and a phone number I could contact her on, she told me she had done everything I had asked for and she felt as if I was wasting her time. In actual fact, she was wasting her own by not answering my god-damned questions. I told her as much, that I knew she was a scammer, and where she could stick it.

Safe to say this got my hopes down a little. It helps that Abel is generally an optimist, “we’ll find something”.

About two days before we left, my friend Kate sent me a link to a post on Instagram. An Australian girl who had just travelled across the US with her boyfriend in a converted ambulance was now selling as their trip came to a close. Immediately after seeing the photos, I frantically waved my hands, said “oh my god”a handful of times, and asked my friend Elle if I could borrow her phone as mine was dead. I messaged Alissa (previous ambo owner) and told her I was extremely interested and would love to hear more.

The ambulance was up for sell with all the necessary gear included: Tables, gas cooker, loads of kitchen supplies, mozzie nets, yoga mats, fishing rod and tackle. So much good stuff. Alissa and I messaged over the course of the next week, talking part about the ambulance but also about their entire trip in general. It was so lovely being able to ask someone for advice on so many of my central concerns; talking with her really put my mind at ease about a lot of things. For example: how did they go travelling without a shower/how did they access one? She told something I would have never thought to do. They joined Planet Fitness, a gym franchise that has 1,500 locations across the USA. The full membership, with all the bells and whistles, is only $21.95 a month and lets you bring a guest for free every single time. That way, she told me, they were able to shower and stay fit while on the road. Goodness knows we’re gonna need to stay fit, we both like the bad foods.

I asked question after question and Alissa totally indulged me, she loved talking about this stuff, and wished she’d been able to ask someone these things when they first started off.

There was only a few things turning us off the ambulance in the beginning: 1. Alissa warned me it was most definitely not insulated. They had done a few stints in cold weather and made do with thermal blankets and a campfire before bed. At this point, our travel-route was going to endure some cold weather, so this was a little concerning for me. And 2. The van was located in Florida. Lucky for me, my parents live there, but then the question was, how do we get this van up to the North-East? So we kind of pushed the ambulance to the back burner. It was awesome, but not completely feasible.

We had a bite whilst in Hawaii, but the seller was a tad odd. I spoke with him on the phone and he didn’t give me a whole lot. Tons of short, closed off answers that made me question whether he really wanted to sell the thing. I told him my aunt would be more than happy to come look, since we wouldn’t be on the east coast for another week or two. He said I could give her his number but he finished off the call with, “Yeah ok, well we’ll see when you’re out here and if the van is still available”. Uhh, ok. Denise called the following day and he told her it sold that morning. I was soo grateful that he gave us the opportunity to check it out.

It wan’t until the end of our NYC trip, as we headed out to CT, that we seriously began looking at more vans and trying to contact people. To be honest, most people gave vague responses, if any at all. Anyone who sounded eager to make a deal, was usually another scammer. I was feeling frustrated and unsure how we were going to move forward with this. Why did people continue to list their van or campers and then made no effort to try and sell them? Most options were oversized too; I could never seem to find the basic high-top camper you might see cruising along the coasts in Australia, parked at a beach carpark for a night or two before moving on to the next.

Denise didn’t have a lot of work on while we were visiting Fairfield and she graciously offered to take us to check out any vans that interested us. People were always telling us to head south to Florida and buy there. It’s warmer and swarming with oldies, so more vans would be floating around. During our first dinner at my Aunt and Uncle’s place, they shed some light on things I’d actively avoided thinking about. Gross administrative things like registration and insurance. Registering your car with your state of residency isn’t an enormous issue, but I’m not really a resident, so I’d have to use my parent’s Floridian address in order to do this. The lingering question was then, how would I get the plates in order to move the vehicle from A to B? We decided going to Florida was our best, and probably last, option. Dad would be able to help us sort out the details and we could take our time with it.

Once this decision was seriously in the works, Abel asked me if the ambulance was still available. Two weeks had nearly passed since my last contact with Alissa and I thought the odds were pretty slim. “Just check”. I couldn’t believe our luck when she replied to my message saying, “Actually, it is”.

Alissa and Lachie had been super busy whilst in West Palm Beach and didn’t have much time for any viewings with other potential buyers. I told her we would be flying down in the next week and if it was still available, we’d love to come and check it out. She pretty much pushed all her other appointments until after we had booked in to see the ambulance that coming Monday. When we’d been messaging previously, Alissa had told me we were at the top of their list. I think they liked knowing it would be going to a good home, to another Aussie couple doing the same thing. Rather than a 40-year-old man who only planned to use it to tailgate football games.

We did the three-hour drive to West Palm Beach and shortly after seeing the van, we were certain we wanted it. We made an offer, paid a deposit and picked it up the following day. Dad used some points he had to put us up at the Hilton Hotel that first night (score), and during check-in the concierge upgraded us to a suite (double score). The next day was leisurely, we laid at the beach for hours (the bonus of heading to Florida and altering our travel-route, more summer weather!) and went to an Aussie/Irish bar in town where we drank $3 margaritas and ate $2 tacos (pretty decent considering this place was anything but Mexican). The waitress told the owner Rod that we were Aussies and he wandered over, plonked himself down with his large, filled wine glass and chatted to us for a good half hour.

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We spent our first night in the van (and only, so far) that evening. She was a hot one, so now we’re kind of looking forward to some cooler evenings. While cooking breakfast that next morning in a beach carpark, we made a heap of older dude friends. They were all going for a morning surf and in awe of our ambulance. “Nice rig you got there,” this one guy said as he walked towards us, leaning his head for a peak inside. They wanted to talk vans and then even better, they wanted to talk Australia. Trust me, I told them, you’ll be getting better waves than this down under. Safe to say she’s gonna be a great spark for conversation, our ambulance.

Once we were back in Tampa at Dad’s place, we did a large Walmart haul to get any of the necessary gear they didn’t already give us. Not that we had to get much. We still spent a lot, but we saved a shit load too.

The ambulance also has three spare batteries that aren’t in use, but they’re practically brand new. We’ve bought an inverter so we can utilise them (we’ve been collecting all the parts over the past few days and Abel will be setting it up soon). We bought a mini-fridge for the front cab area, which will hook up to the spare batteries, and when the time comes, we’ll be able to buy and use a cheap electrical heater to fight off the frosty winter evenings.

It’s been so nice making the ambulance into a home. We’ve slowly been moving our things in, organising the cupboards and getting it all set-up and ready for the road. Our journey has been off to a slow start due to an issue with our “arriving” inverter from Amazon. It says it was delivered on Saturday, but it most certainly was not. Not the best of luck in that department, but I can’t be too ungrateful… because we bought a fricken ambulance! I don’t really know my opinions about the operation of the universe, they’re still forming and shaping, but I guess when Alissa said the ambulance was still available, I took that as a sign– it was meant for us. In some cosmic sort of way. I guess.

So here she is, meet our ride:

 

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(If anyone can think of a good name for her, please let me know. The previous owners named her Bambi, but I think we should shake things up little)

I’ll be back soon to talk about our first part of the road trip and van life.

A

OUR TIME IN NEW YORK

Every time I’m back in “the city” it feels familiar with a subtle air of difference. Although, it’s most likely I who has changed and not New York itself. Since I grew up in Connecticut, New York was always just “the city”, much like Sydney is back home. I couldn’t tell you how many times I’ve been there. Five years ago on my last visit to the USA, I was 18 and NYC was very impressionable on me. No doubt people feel differently about it, but to me, New York forces you to dream big, feel alive and believe you’re capable of absolutely anything. It’s filled with 8 million different kinds of people and I think that’s where this whole lack of judgement among its citizens stems from. Everyone and anyone can find their niche in this city and that’s what makes it so great.

The Jane Hotel is over a 100 years old. I booked this hotel not just for it’s prime location along the Hudson, settled right into the West Village and not far from Chelsea, but for the atmosphere I knew it would have just from looking at the pictures. Total Wes Anderson vibes. Here’s some pics from their site itself, because I repeatedly forgot to take my own…

Lobby
Ballroom and Mezzanine
Rooftop Bar

 

Rooftop Bar Balcony (all images sourced from here)

The Jane Hotel is an old sailor’s cabin, men would come and retire here for the evening after long journeys at sea. Abel overheard one night at the bar, that back in 1912 when the Titanic sank, all of the survivors were sent to The Jane. They still host a remembrance night on the anniversary each year, apparently. I knew none of this, obviously, when booking, but these photos were enough to entice me and overlook the price. I booked us a sailor’s bunk (our cheapest option) and figured we would either enjoy the space away from each other, or I’d force Abel to squeeze into one bed together (we tried this one night and it only lasted a few hours). The cabin was a shoebox. Literally, we couldn’t lay any of our bags on the floor. One person was forced to sit on their bed and wait patiently while one of us dressed and readied for the day– then we would swap. The room also meant we shared a bathroom with others, but this didn’t phase me. I’ve done the whole hostel thing many a times (some nasty, some not) and these bathrooms were exceptionally clean (I knew they would be, take a look at more photos on the link).

Quickly after shuffling into our room for the first time, and stumbling over our bags, we deeply questioned an upgrade. Fuck it, we’re in New York baby! This idea deflated real fast when I checked and noticed a standard double suite would cost us an extra $200 a night. Not entirely in our budget. We wouldn’t be spending much time in the room anyway, so it didn’t really matter. And apart from the size issue (and the springy beds) the room was nice. We both had our own TV, fresh towels, robes and slippers each day– we really couldn’t complain. Besides, the allure of the hotel was in its public locations anyway. A ballroom, rooftop bar and restaurant all on site. The first few nights the ballroom was closed for private events, so we drank at the rooftop. All the while I was thinking, where is this grand room I was promised in the photos? After talking to the bartender, he told us it would be back in full swing by the weekend and he assured us it was a good time: “Literally there will be a line outside around the corner, it gets really busy. But you guys are guests so you get to come straight through and skip the whole line.” That made party-hunting a little easier, we didn’t have to go anywhere and no stress about late night subway or taxi rides.

Now I’ll talk a little less about our hotel and a bit more about the city itself and what we did while we were there. We pretty much ticked most of the stuff off the list. I’ve done a lot of the main tourist attractions, so this visit was more about fuelling Abel’s NYC desires. He’s a simple guy though and honestly wasn’t too fussed. A lot of pressure was taken off as well because we know for a fact we’ll be coming back here, and at Christmas time too (!!), which is just magical. I really can’t wait to see the tree all lit, starry and bright, towering over Rockefeller Centre. A favourite spectacle of mine.

Since there was no pressure, we didn’t get around to visiting the World Trade Centre (I’ve been twice), but we will certainly go when we are back. It really is a must for anyone seeing the city. It’s moving and eerie, but you just can’t avoid going. We also didn’t go to the top of any buildings, such as the Empire State. I hate heights, although my dear friend Claudia dragged me up there last visit and it wasn’t too frightening. The elevator was the worst part, but the twinkling view was rewarding.

Instead of The Met (I have also frequented) we visited The Museum of Modern Art (MoMa), mainly to experience Van Gogh’s Starry Night and Monet’s Water Lillies, both surrounded by plenty of other amazing artworks. Not that we really know much about art, but it’s nice knowing that despite the small amount of knowledge we might have on a topic or piece, it can still move you and make you feel a certain way. Often we don’t even know what that feeling is or what it means to us, but art is enthralling like that. It sparks something within you, allows it to burn for a few moments while you question yourself and everything around you and more often that not, we are left with more questions than answers. Answers are boring anyway, how we ask questions is what keeps life appealing. Here’s some of the works that did that for me:

I’m a fool for not remembering or taking note of this artist. Hopefully this isn’t illegal. Anyone who knows, let me know. Because I loved this.

Plus the two main attractions:

Claude Monet’s Water Lillies
Vincent Van Gogh’s Starry Night

Earlier this day we visited the Central Park Zoo and it’s not that I was disappointed– not at all, in fact– but Madagascar (the film), whilst it is a classic, is a total sham. There is not a single lion, zebra, hippo nor giraffe at the Central Park Zoo. The penguins and monkeys were definitely there though. The red pandas were the real highlight. Mischievous little cat-dog creatures, actually related to raccoons, constantly rummaging through the ground foliage and climbing tree branches. I wanted to take one home with me. It was like a boutique zoo, small in its overall size, but not in regards to the animals’ spaces or the quality. Walking all around were zoo workers offering facts and conversation with the visitors. It really was a sweet place.

Red Panda
Sweet sleeping grizzly. If the claws weren’t there, I could cuddle this thing forever.

One of the most exciting things we ticked off was a broadway show. I wasn’t too sure how I could drag Abel to one of these, since he’s not much a ‘musical’ guy. I don’t mind the simple breaking-out-into-song, I kind of wish life was like that, so musicals really do it for me. Not to mention there were some killer choices: Mean Girls, Pretty Woman, Frozen. Like honestly, any of those would have served me well. Not to worry though, on our first day I spotted a little advertisement perched on the top of a yellow-taxi. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. Not a musical and pretty perfect for two die-hard HP fans.

We lucked out in the ticket department, because this show is actually a two-part act. Not your standard show with intermission, but two shows. I knew we couldn’t really see one and not the other, that just wouldn’t make a lot of sense, right? So I purchased the two-part tickets and damn, we got lucky. Orchestra seats booked the evening before. We had been mentally preparing to sit down for a good 5-6 hours of play-time. I thought that was pretty weird, but who was I to question these things. Part one ended and when everyone was up and leaving we asked the lady next to us when we would see part two, “Come back at 7:30. Your two part ticket gave you the matinee, part one, and the evening show, part two.” Now that made a lot more sense. A quick break for Chipotle and the whole time we were thinking, what will part two bring?! 

I had seriously questioned this play when it was first released. I remember flicking through it whilst in Kmart once and seeing names of deceased characters in speaking roles and I thought, well that’s just fucking stupidBut honestly, not only was it well-written, but the entire performance was top notch. I mean, we did watch it on broadway, but the acting, the music, the theatrics was all of such a high calibre. All that talent on display, while being back in the magical world of wizardry, was just sublime. Don’t question it, just go. And see both parts. I have no idea how someone could go to part one and that alone. You’d be left hanging in the middle of an epic tale… so that’s how they make the money!

The last big tourist thing we did was venture over to Ellis Island. Ellis Island is where, for years, immigrants came through for processing before entering the United States. I’d been here once before, in 5th grade on a field trip. It was nice to go back with a bit more appreciation for history. Our ferry over stopped at Liberty Island, but we didn’t get off. You can see the Statue of Liberty as you pull up, and to be honest, that’s the best view you’re gonna get of her. Out in the water while she stands tall in the distance.

Lady Liberty

Those were really the main things we experienced while in NY. I mean, we ticked plenty of other things off our list, most of them being food items. A good slice of New York pizza on more than one occasion. We frequented Village Pizza, a few blocks from The Jane. Serious authentic quality, the sauce was a treat to the taste buds. And on our first night we took full advantage of “the city that never sleeps”– we ordered pizza and hot cookies to our room, well past midnight, just because we could.

Village Pizza

I’ve been following a Chef (named Anthony, @chefanthony_ballatosnyc) who works at Emilio’s Ballato for over a year now on Instagram. I actually came across his page from, I believe it was Miley Cyrus. The photos he posts of their food is seriously mouth-watering. I used to scroll through his feed, starving for one of these authentic Italian meals. I knew it was of high quality, not only because of their patron Miley Cyrus, but the entire array of celebrities that go there. Obama included. They don’t take reservations, they operate on a first-come first-served basis, which made things a bit easier for us. I knew we’d have to arrive as soon as they opened to snag a table. Surely people in the city aren’t going to be feasting on their evening meal at 5pm, right? Luckily we got a table, because they were filling up fast. Not long after we were seated, a queue slowly started to form and snake its way onto the street. The food was exceptional. Simple, high-quality, fresh food. No wonder so many well-known people frequent there. Abel was seriously convinced that seated behind us was former vice-president Joe Biden. Any time we weren’t in silence from shovelling homemade pasta into our gobs, we were debating about the white-haired man. It was not Joe Biden. I repeat, it was not Joe Biden.

However, we did spot one ‘celebrity’, a man staying at our hotel. On our first night I saw him at the rooftop bar, turned to give a casual smile and probably held his eyes for a moment too long. I instantly recognised him, but for the life of me, I cannot tell you where from. I’m not crazy either, he’s definitely ‘known’, because a few moments later a young girl went up to chat with him and take a selfie. She shuffled out of there pretty quickly so I couldn’t catch his name. I spent a lot of my time in New York googling “actors with grey hair and scruffy beards”. One day I’ll spot him on the screen and squeal with pure relief.

It was really just nice to wonder the streets, ride the subway, and visit the hotspots (Washington Square Park, Times Square, the Chelsea Highline) like we were little live-ins. If you can get enough time to visit the city properly, you’ve kinda gotta pretend you’re a local. I mean, no doubt we gave off tourist vibes with the Aussie accents (although, fair warning, mine is becoming a pure hybrid at the moment), but you really have to do your best to live New York like a true New Yorker. Push through the crowds, walk fast, do whatever you want to do, how you want to do it.

But don’t worry, we still managed to stop and look up at the towering buildings in awe, and let the bright lights wash through us. Plus Abel got really excited about the squirrels in Central Park (way to blow our cover, man).

Squirrel! (He is still getting excited by them)
Central Park

Empire State

Chelsea Highline

Now we’re in my hometown of Fairfield, CT, staying at my Aunt Melissa and Uncle Michel’s place. This was always my second home while growing up, so it’s really nice to be back here. We have done… not a lot this whole week. Once again, we’ve been snoozing ’til about 10 or 11 am most mornings. But hey, why not? Most days consist of going for a stroll, starting a fire outside and reading by it for hours to warm up. The leaves are turning more orange and yellow with each day that passes. The air is fresh, a lot like our winter temperatures back home, but we’re slowly becoming acclimated. Abel has been wearing thermals under his clothes the past few days, but you do what you’ve got to do! It really is my favourite time of year around here. Halloween is creeping up and I forgot how much I loved that holiday. Just ask Abel, I can’t stop randomly chirping, “Happy Halloween!”, “Trick or treat!” Autumn brings so many things with it: the smell of pumpkin, cinnamon, apple cider and freshly fallen leaves. There’s nothing like it.

Though we won’t be experiencing it for too much longer. This week was meant to be our time to buy a van, but we’ve made slight alterations to our original plans. Since we’re going to have to register a car in the country, you need a permanent address, which my dad has in Florida. Buying a car down there, closer to him, makes more sense. Plus, there are a lot more options for vans/campers down there. Tomorrow, we fly to Tampa. This definitely changes our road-tripping route, but we don’t mind. I haven’t seen my Dad since January, so seeing him before Christmas is going to be really nice. Plus, there is a real funky vehicle we’re going to check out on Monday. Fingers crossed it all works out. Stay tuned, because I know y’all are gonna love it.

A

LIL BIT OF SAN FRANCISCO

We finally made it to the mainland and reunited with some of my family–hooray!

It was so nice to feel “at home” and be able to relax a little without feeling completely guilty for not getting out, doing and seeing things.

My aunt Lauren, uncle Kurt and their kids Max (11) and Natasha (5) live just outside of the city in Lafayette. I visited last time I was in the states, but the kids were real young then. It was nice to “re-meet” my cousins and spend time with the family. Max is sweet and quiet and definitely turning into a very smart cookie. Natasha was exuding excitement about meeting us. She arrived home from school, grinning ear to ear as she gave me a little cuddle, then she watched me attentively, her head pressed against the window, while I sat outside and read. It wasn’t long before she started climbing all over Abel, begging us to play tag and Peppa Pig with her.

To be honest, most mornings in Lafayette Abel and I arose at around 10 or 11 am. We had done a red-eye from Honolulu. I passed out for the whole flight, experiencing weird dreams about sleeping on a plane. It’s damn strange how our brains do that. I was in a deep sleep, but I was very aware of where I was and what I was doing. Abel took a sleeping pill too, and just like our first flight, barely slept a wink. I don’t know how he managed to fight off the drug-induced hallucinations as well, but he had a decent 6-hour nap our first day in Cali.

We really only had three main touristy days. The first was a visit to Stinson Beach and the Redwoods. We drove in my aunt’s Ford Explorer–a little beast– around winding roads, with huge escarpments banked to the right, and a steep drop with no railing or fence to our left. Our mission was completed, we’d made it to the park entrance, only to be told we were required to reserve parking and wouldn’t be able to return for another hour and 30 minutes. No problem, Lauren had told us Stinson beach was a cute little town, so we journeyed back up the climbing roads and down some more towards the coastline. Time ticked away pretty quickly as we drove, so our visit to to Stinson was a mere stroll along the beach, a quick coffee and stop in the cutest little bookshop.

Seeing beaches that are so vastly different from the ones back home is always interesting. At Stinson, there are houses built directly on the sand, with metre high walls to stop the tides from causing any damage. I thought living a street back from the beach was enough create to worry about tsunamis, but these guys would be toast.


This is the little literature shop I dragged Abel into (and subtly hinted at the card section for my upcoming birthday haha). The owner had a vast but nicely curated selection of books. Working for the past six or so months in a bookshop has taught me a lot about the industry (on top of my organic adoration for books and writing) and I immediately want to talk and ask questions upon questions. It wasn’t really needed, because the owner muttered to herself behind the counter, apologised and went on to tell me about issues she was having with arriving shipments from her publishers. I could wander (or loiter) in a bookshop for hours and not even buy anything. Looking at the different stories and texts that are out there, breathing in the distinct scent of ink and fresh paper, is more than enough for me.

The Redwoods had a few different trail options. We decided to take the “middle” one, meaning not the shortest nor the longest. Turns out it was a lot longer than we had realised, starting with an incline that took us up through the woods and out into an open space, with a valley falling out far below us. Huge hills sat cuddled close together and you could just vaguely see the ocean in the distance (always a sigh of relief and comfort for me). The Bay Area is foggy as hell so the strip of ocean almost felt like a mirage. We struggled to get high quality photos, especially since we’re learning photographers.

After making our way up and out of the valley, the trail circled back through the forest and the trees slowly became more mammoth like. I questioned Abel on the possibility of mountain lines, but figured there weren’t any warning signs at the beginning of the trail, so surely we were safe. Maybe two minutes later Abel stopped dead in his tracks, grabbed me and told me to look to my left. A furry, brown blob appeared in my peripherals and I screamed at an intense decibel. It was just a stag.

Two days later was my 24th birthday and it just didn’t feel like it all. I mean, I had such a wonderful day and entire weekend (Lauren bought me cute pressies, cooked us a wonderful dinner on the Sunday and ordered a selection of delectable cupcakes), but all day, I kept forgetting it was my birthday– I guess that’s the burden of ageing. That was the first day Abel and I ventured into the city, an easy 40 minute (if that) train ride from Lafayette. The day was spent walking along the pier, gorging on In-N-Out, visiting Reformation and buying myself a classic black dress, cocktails, wine, more gorging, more wine.

In-N-Out has a huge reputation around it and there was no disappointment for us. While the place was packed–the line snaking around and out of the front doors– the food was fresh, cheap and came out within a matter of 15-20 minutes. We visited again two days later.

During my last visit in San Francisco, my cousin Elise took me on a mission across the city so we could shop at her favourite store. Literally, I think she said “just two more blocks” about 10 times. I ended up with blisters from my jelly sandals (what was I thinking?) and had to walk barefoot in the city. Abel and I had a good laugh because I pretty much did that exact same thing to him on this visit. I believed Reformation was a matter of a few blocks away and led Abel far up Fillmore Street (known for it’s steep hills and steps). Totally worth it, in my opinion– the dress is gorgeous and I’ll have it forever.

All the walking meant we were ready to start drinking and we pretty much bar-hopped around the Marina District for the rest of the evening. We went to the Tipsy Pig twice. In the late afternoon it was packed with young people enjoying early cocktails in the beer garden. When we returned later in the evening, it had calmed down considerably, but the heaters and fairy lights were in full swing, and we had planked ourselves right next to an Aussie! Hearing that familiar accent was beyond comforting for us. Something about being with someone from home just means you can sit back and relax– you’re all on the “same level” in a way. Regardless that he was a bit of dickhead, it was still just lovely.


Our third and final tourist event we ticked off was our visit to Alcatraz Island, where there was once a maximum security prison. We didn’t walk around the entire island, even though there’s much more to see, we were mainly interested in the prison. The free audio tour was spectacular. Voices from the officers and surviving prisoners took us through the prison depicting what life had been like there. A few of them had tried to escape, some successfully and others not. I use “successfully” lightly– they made it out, but were never seen again. Whether they drowned or went to South America, no one knows. One of the quotes plastered on a big sign said that when you broke the rules, you went to prison, but when you broke prison rules, you went to Alcatraz.

Some families of the guards even lived on the island, in this house:

Prisoners could sometimes see the San Francisco skyline, depending on where their cell was located. They talked of hearing party sounds on New Years Eve from boats on the water. Imagine being so isolated from freedom but so close to it? You’d rather be in a prison settled into the middle of nowhere, so you can’t remember the sounds and smells of the free world.

Balancing the relaxing with the exploring was key for our time in Lafayette and SF. The nice thing was knowing we’ll probably be back there at some point and we can do even more. We’ll be in California by April (Coachella baby) so another visit with the fam will definitely be on the cards.

New York City is over now too and we’re back with more family, East Coast this time. I’ll be back to tell y’all about it soon.

A